Dexamethasone Sod Phosphate-PF

Pronounced

"dex-uh-METH-uh-sown"

Common brand names:

Oradexon

Uses

Dexamethasone is used to treat conditions such as arthritis, blood/hormone disorders, allergic reactions, skin diseases, eye problems, breathing problems, bowel disorders, cancer, and immune system disorders. It is also used as a test for an adrenal gland disorder (Cushing's syndrome).

Dexamethasone belongs to a class of drugs known as corticosteroids. It decreases your immune system's response to various diseases to reduce symptoms such as swelling and allergic-type reactions.

This injectable form of dexamethasone is used when a similar drug cannot be taken by mouth or when a very fast response is needed, especially in patients with severe medical conditions. Talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of dexamethasone, especially if it is to be injected near your spine (epidural). Rare but serious side effects may occur with epidural use.

Other Uses

This section contains uses of this drug that are not listed in the approved professional labeling for the drug but that may be prescribed by your health care professional. Use this drug for a condition that is listed in this section only if it has been so prescribed by your health care professional.

This drug may also be used to reduce the risk of nausea and vomiting caused by cancer chemotherapy.

How to Use This Medication

Depending on your product, this medication is given by injection into a vein, muscle, joint, or skin area as directed by your doctor. Follow your doctor's directions carefully. The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. Your doctor may attempt to reduce your dose slowly from time to time to minimize side effects.

If you are giving this medication to yourself at home, learn all preparation and usage instructions from your health care professional. Before using, check this product visually for particles or discoloration. If either is present, do not use the liquid. Learn how to store and discard medical supplies safely.

Do not stop using this medication without consulting your doctor. Some conditions may become worse when this drug is suddenly stopped. Also, you may experience symptoms such as nausea, dizziness, weakness, or muscle/joint pain. To prevent these symptoms while you are stopping treatment with this drug, your doctor may reduce your dose gradually. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more details. Report any new or worsening symptoms right away.

Tell your doctor if your condition does not improve or if it worsens.

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Drug information is selected from data included with permission and copyrighted by First DataBank, Inc. This is a summary and does not contain all possible information about this product. For complete information about this product or your specific health needs, ask your healthcare professional. Always seek the advice of your healthcare professional if you have any questions about this product or your medical condition. This information is not intended as individual medical advice and does not substitute for the knowledge and judgment of your healthcare professional. This information does not contain any assurances that this product is safe, effective or appropriate for you.

This information is intended only for residents of the United States. Products sold under the same brand names in other countries may contain different ingredients.

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Information expires December 2020.