Naltrexone-Bupropion

Pronounced

"nal-TREX-one/bue-PROE-pee-on"

Common brand names:

Contrave

Uses

This medication is used with a doctor-approved exercise, behavior change, and reduced-calorie diet program to help you lose weight. It is used by certain overweight people, such as those who are obese or have weight-related medical problems. Losing weight and keeping it off can lessen the many health risks that come with obesity, including heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, and a shorter life.

Naltrexone belongs to a class of drugs known as opiate antagonists, and bupropion is an antidepressant that may help restore the balance of certain natural chemicals (neurotransmitters) in your brain. These two medications work together on separate parts of the brain to reduce appetite and how much you eat.

Most opiates should not be used for 7 to 10 days before starting naltrexone, but some opiate drugs (such as methadone) should not be used for 10 to 14 days before starting naltrexone. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more details.

Other forms of naltrexone or bupropion are used to treat a variety of conditions including depression, other mental/mood disorders, smoking cessation, addiction to opioid medication, and alcohol abuse. This combination product is not approved for these other uses.

Discuss the risks and benefits of this medication, as well as other ways to lose weight, with your doctor.

How to Use This Medication

Read the Medication Guide if available from your pharmacist before you start taking naltrexone/bupropion and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Take this medication by mouth with a low-fat meal as directed by your doctor, usually twice daily.

You may have trouble sleeping when you start taking this drug. Do not take your evening dose too close to bedtime.

Swallow the tablets whole. Do not crush or chew this medication. Doing so can release all of the drug at once, increasing the risk of side effects such as seizures.

The dosage is based on your medical condition, response to treatment, and other medications you may be taking. Your dose will be slowly increased to lower the risk of seizures and to limit side effects such as sleeplessness, symptoms of withdrawal from opiates, and high blood pressure. Do not increase your dose, take it more often, or stop taking it without your doctor's approval.

Use this medication regularly to get the most benefit from it. To help you remember, take it at the same times each day.

Tell your doctor if you have not lost weight after 16 weeks on this medication.

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Drug information is selected from data included with permission and copyrighted by First DataBank, Inc. This is a summary and does not contain all possible information about this product. For complete information about this product or your specific health needs, ask your healthcare professional. Always seek the advice of your healthcare professional if you have any questions about this product or your medical condition. This information is not intended as individual medical advice and does not substitute for the knowledge and judgment of your healthcare professional. This information does not contain any assurances that this product is safe, effective or appropriate for you.

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Information expires December 2022.